Are we done with face masks?
04:33
Vox

Are we done with face masks?

Mandates around the globe are ending, but don’t throw out your masks yet. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Face masks were one of our earliest interventions to slow the spread of Covid-19. For two years we’ve largely relied on local governments and businesses to tell us when and where to wear them, but now those mandates are being lifted. So is it actually safe to take off the masks for good? It depends on who you are and where you are. Cases are dropping in many places around the world after a harsh omicron surge, but some countries are still fighting off deadly waves of the virus. Many public health experts are warning that the pandemic isn’t over yet, even if it feels like it is to some of us. It’s a good idea to hang onto your mask for now, but that doesn’t mean you have to wear it every day for the rest of your life, just that you should take a few key things into consideration. Check out the video above to learn more about risk mitigation as we weather the third year of a pandemic. Some resources for Covid-19 numbers: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/world/covid-cases.html https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html Studies on the effectiveness of face masks and mandates: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0252315 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02786826.2020.1862409 https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abi9069 https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2015954117 And more from the CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/science/science-briefs/masking-science-sars-cov2.html https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7106e1.htm Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: http://vox.com/video-newsletter Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: http://vox.com/contribute-now Shop the Vox merch store: http://vox.com/store Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://facebook.com/vox Follow Vox on Twitter: http://twitter.com/voxdotcom Follow Vox on TikTok: http://tiktok.com/@voxdotcom
How American conservatives turned against the vaccine
14:48
Vox

How American conservatives turned against the vaccine

The partisan pandemic, explained in 15 charts. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO President Donald Trump presided over the fastest vaccine development process in history, leading to abundant, free vaccines in the US by the spring of 2021. Although the mRNA Covid-19 vaccines haven’t been able to stop transmission of the virus, they have been highly effective against hospitalization and death, saving hundreds of thousands of lives and rendering the majority of new Covid-19 deaths preventable. Trump has received three doses of the vaccine. But many of his most dedicated supporters have refused, and many have died as a result. Why? Obvious culprits include misinformation on social media and Fox News and the election of Joe Biden, which placed a Democrat at the top of the US government throughout the vaccine distribution period. But if you look closely at the data, you’ll see that vaccine-hesitant conservatives largely made up their mind well before the vaccines were available and before Donald Trump lost the 2020 election. To understand why, I took a deep dive into the data, interviewed researchers, and spoke to people who lost loved ones to preventable severe Covid-19 infections. What I found is a stark cautionary tale for the country and for Republican political elites. Partisan polarization takes on a life of its own; once set into motion it’s nearly impossible to stop, even when the fallout is immense and irreparable. Accepting donations in memory of Philly Baird and Phil Valentine: https://phillybairdisthechange.org/ https://nashvillerescuemission.org/mission-in-my-words-phil-valentine/ Sources: https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Provisional-COVID-19-Deaths-by-Sex-and-Age/9bhg-hcku https://data.cdc.gov/Vaccinations/COVID-19-Vaccinations-in-the-United-States-Jurisdi/unsk-b7fc https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#rates-by-vaccine-status https://data.cdc.gov/Public-Health-Surveillance/Rates-of-COVID-19-Cases-or-Deaths-by-Age-Group-and/3rge-nu2a https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/poll-finding/kff-covid-19-vaccine-monitor-january-2022/ https://dataverse.harvard.edu/dataset.xhtml?persistentId=doi:10.7910/DVN/42MVDX https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/news-polls/reuters-ipso https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/01/07/more-americans-now-see-very-high-preventive-health-benefits-from-measles-vaccine/ https://www.pewresearch.org/journalism/2020/01/24/democrats-report-much-higher-levels-of-trust-in-a-number-of-news-sources-than-republicans/ https://www.kff.org/report-section/kff-covid-19-vaccine-monitor-january-2021-sources-of-information/ https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/poll-finding/kff-covid-19-vaccine-monitor-media-and-misinformation/ https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/27-vaccinated-coronavirus-republicans-conservatives-poll/story?id=70962377 https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/poll-finding/importance-of-partisanship-predicting-vaccination-status/ https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/01/27/attention-to-covid-19-news-increased-slightly-amid-omicron-surge-partisans-differ-in-views-about-the-outbreak/ft_2022-01-27_covidnews_03/ https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0250123 https://www.pascl.stanford.edu/ https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/12/05/1059828993/data-vaccine-misinformation-trump-counties-covid-death-rate https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/08/briefing/covid-death-toll-red-america.html Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: http://vox.com/video-newsletter Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: http://vox.com/contribute-now Shop the Vox merch store: http://vox.com/store Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://facebook.com/vox Follow Vox on Twitter: http://twitter.com/voxdotcom Follow Vox on TikTok: http://tiktok.com/@voxdotcom
Big questions about the Covid booster shot, answered
07:50
Vox

Big questions about the Covid booster shot, answered

How omicron has reframed the booster debate. Subscribe and turn on notifications 🔔 so you don't miss any videos: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Much of the messaging from authorities around Covid-19 booster shots has been confusing — and that’s partly because scientists themselves haven’t always agreed on who needs them. When many countries began to recommend boosters not just for the older and high-risk, but for all adults, they were essentially taking sides in a still-unresolved debate around that question: Why give an extra dose to healthy adults who are still very protected against severe Covid-19 cases from their original dose? But since the omicron variant has emerged, many have changed their minds. To understand why, we talked to one formerly skeptical expert who scheduled her own booster shot based on what she learned about omicron. We spoke to her about what happens in your immune system when you get that third (or second) shot, and why it could be especially useful in stopping the spread of omicron. Make sure you never miss behind-the-scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter. Sign up here: http://vox.com/video-newsletter Since our conversation with Dr. Gounder, newer data seems to corroborate the prediction that boosters will be effective against omicron: https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/12/08/world/omicron-variant-covid Vox's Dylan Scott reported on many of the early questions around omicron: https://www.vox.com/coronavirus-covid19/2021/12/1/22809878/covid-19-omicron-variant-vaccine-booster-shots Our World in Data is probably the best place to see how your county is doing with boosters: ​​https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/covid-vaccine-booster-doses-per-capita And what percent is already fully vaccinated: https://ourworldindata.org/grapher/share-people-fully-vaccinated-covid And these are the studies we refer to in the video: This one from Israel shows the benefit a booster can give longer-term: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(21)02249-2/fulltext And these US studies show the waning effectiveness of the vaccines against any infection: https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736%2821%2902183-8 https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.10.08.21264595v1.full.pdf This was the presentation NIH gave the FDA after studying mixing and matching Pfizer, Modern and J&J: https://www.fda.gov/media/153128/download And here’s a study on mixing AstraZeneca with mRNA vaccines: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01464-w You can watch more of our Covid-19 coverage here: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5dBbOh_8kPN5s5aJHt1UCwn Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: http://vox.com/contribute-now Shop the Vox merch store: http://vox.com/store Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://facebook.com/vox Follow Vox on Twitter: http://twitter.com/voxdotcom Follow Vox on TikTok: http://tiktok.com/@voxdotcom
How Taiwan held off Covid-19, until it didn't
09:41
Vox

How Taiwan held off Covid-19, until it didn't

Another pandemic will come. Here’s what we can learn from Taiwan’s efforts to fight this one. Subscribe and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In December 2019, Taiwan‘s government learned that at least seven atypical pneumonia cases had been reported in Wuhan, China. Because of Taiwan’s proximity to China and the number of flights back and forth, it was expected to have the second-highest number of Covid-19 cases worldwide. Instead, Taiwan has had one of the lowest Covid-19 death rates in the world. Thanks in part to a sophisticated digitized health care system and a mandatory two-week quarantine for all travelers, life in Taiwan went on with relative normalcy. But then, in May 2021, a new wave of cases complicated the country’s success. So how did Taiwan, the ninth-most densely populated nation in the world, avoid a more severe spread of a highly contagious virus for so long? And what lessons can be learned from their response to the outbreak? Correction: We omitted a credit to our Taipei-based producer, Clarissa Wei. This video was made possible by a grant from the nonprofit Commonwealth Fund as part of our Pandemic Playbook series: https://www.vox.com/22403980/the-pandemic-playbook Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why so many Covid-19 variants are showing up now
06:22
Vox

Why so many Covid-19 variants are showing up now

And what that tells us about the pandemic. Subscribe and turn on notifications (🔔) so you don't miss any videos: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Like any virus, SARS-CoV-2 has been mutating constantly since the beginning of the pandemic. Until November of 2020, though, that didn’t seem to matter. That’s when scientists in the United Kingdom noticed an alarming change: The virus had mutated in a way that made it more transmissible. Within a month, similar reports were emerging from places around the world. Suddenly, it seemed the virus was changing at an alarming rate. SARS-CoV-2 hasn’t actually been mutating faster, though. Instead, by letting it spread around the world, we’ve just given it more and more opportunities to mutate as it replicates. The result is that, after countless random mutations, there are signs that the virus is beginning to adapt to our natural defenses. And because it’s completely normal for a virus to change over time, we shouldn’t expect it to stop. The only real way to stop those changes is to stop giving the virus so many opportunities. Read more coverage from Vox on Covid-19 variants: https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/22247525/covid-19-variants-uk-south-africa-brazil-b117-why-now https://www.vox.com/22385588/covid-19-vaccine-variant-mutation-n440k-india-moderna-pfizer-b1617 https://www.vox.com/22298973/covid-19-vaccine-mutation-coronavirus-variant-moderna-pfizer-johnson Data on Covid-19 cases and vaccination rates: https://ourworldindata.org/covid-vaccinations Interactive data on the SARS-CoV-2 genome: https://nextstrain.org/ncov/global More on the variants: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/health/coronavirus-variant-tracker.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
How rich countries are making the pandemic last longer
08:44
Vox

How rich countries are making the pandemic last longer

A program called Covax wants to distribute Covid-19 vaccines fairly. Is it working? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Early in the Covid-19 pandemic, many of the world’s richest countries poured money into the race for a vaccine. Billions of dollars, from programs like the US’s Operation Warp Speed, funded development that brought us multiple Covid-19 vaccines in record time. But it also determined where those vaccines would go. Before vaccine doses had even hit the market, places like the US and the UK had bought up nearly the entire supply. This turns out to be an old story. In nearly every modern global health crisis, from smallpox to malaria to H1N1, rich countries have bought up vital medical supplies, making poor countries wait sometimes decades for life-saving support. It’s effectively a system in which where you live determines whether you live or die of a preventable disease. Leaving a disease like Covid-19 to spread unchecked in some places also gives it a chance to mutate -- and variants of the virus are already raising alarms. So: how do we get vaccines to countries that can’t afford them? One solution underway is called Covax. It’s a program co-led by the World Health Organization; Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance; and the Coalition of Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI). Its goal is to get vaccines to lower- and middle-income countries at the same time as rich countries. So how is it supposed to do that? And will it be enough? More from Vox.com’s Julia Belluz + Jen Kirby on Covax and vaccine nationalism: https://www.vox.com/21448719/covid-19-vaccine-covax-who-gavi-cepi https://www.vox.com/2021/2/24/22298981/ghana-vaccines-global-covax-initiative https://www.vox.com/2021/1/29/22253908/rich-countries-hoarding-covid-19-vaccines Duke Global Health Innovation Center data: https://launchandscalefaster.org/covid-19/vaccineprocurement More on vaccine nationalism: https://www.oxfam.org/en/press-releases/campaigners-warn-9-out-10-people-poor-countries-are-set-miss-out-covid-19-vaccine https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2021/02/04/963741244/in-vaccine-race-middle-income-nations-are-at-a-disadvantage-just-ask-peru More on the H1N1 pandemic: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2864298/ https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/2009-pandemic-timeline.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Why you can't compare Covid-19 vaccines
07:02
Vox

Why you can't compare Covid-19 vaccines

What a vaccine's "efficacy rate" actually means. Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.vox.com/video-newsletter In the US, the first two available Covid-19 vaccines were the ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. Both vaccines have very high "efficacy rates," of around 95%. But the third vaccine introduced in the US, from Johnson & Johnson, has a considerably lower efficacy rate: just 66%. Look at those numbers next to each other, and it's natural to conclude that one of them is considerably worse. Why settle for 66% when you can have 95%? But that isn't the right way to understand a vaccine's efficacy rate, or even to understand what a vaccine does. And public health experts say that if you really want to know which vaccine is the best one, efficacy isn't actually the most important number at all. Further reading from Vox: Why comparing Covid-19 vaccine efficacy numbers can be misleading: https://www.vox.com/22311625/covid-19-vaccine-efficacy-johnson-moderna-pfizer The vaccine metric that matters more than efficacy: https://www.vox.com/22273502/covid-vaccines-pfizer-moderna-johnson-astrazeneca-efficacy-deaths The limits of what vaccine efficacy numbers can tell us: https://www.vox.com/21575420/oxford-moderna-pfizer-covid-19-vaccine-trial-biontech-astrazeneca-results Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Can we get rid of Covid-19 forever?
08:14
Vox

Can we get rid of Covid-19 forever?

How to eradicate a disease, in 4 steps. ✉️ Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.vox.com/video-newsletter As of March 2021, Covid-19 has killed more than 2.5 million people. It’s brought on a dramatic economic downfall, a mental health crisis, and has generally just put the world on pause. But we don’t have to look far back in history to see how much worse it could have been. Smallpox was twice as contagious as Covid-19, and over 60 times as deadly. It plagued humanity for centuries, left many survivors blinded and covered in scars, and killed hundreds of millions of people in the 20th century alone. But today, smallpox has been eradicated. Through a massive global effort, we were able to wipe the disease completely out of existence. So can we do the same thing with Covid-19? And if we can’t, what are our other options? Read the article this video is based on, by Kelsey Piper: https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/21493812/smallpox-eradication-vaccines-infectious-disease-covid-19 On Smallpox: https://www.amazon.com/House-Fire-Eradicate-Smallpox-California/dp/0520274474 https://www.cdc.gov/smallpox/history/history.html Edward Jenner’s story and more on the first vaccine: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1200696/ https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/smallpox-vaccines https://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/special-edition-on-infectious-disease/2014/the-fight-over-inoculation-during-the-1721-boston-smallpox-epidemic/ On the Balmis Expedition, which brought the smallpox vaccine around the world: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/01/orphans-smallpox-vaccine-distribution/617646/ The fascinating story of the last smallpox outbreak in the United States: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/18/nyregion/nyc-smallpox-vaccine.html Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H